Of Quantum Mechanics

"I think I can state that nobody really understands quantum mechanics."

-- Richard Feynman

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Comments (8)

  1. stevehayes13

    That’s because it is intuitively incomprehensible. In our intuitions, things cannot be in two places at the same time, things cannot be one thing and something else at the same time.

    March 21, 2017
    1. rallen2

      Indeed. Things cannot be in two places at the same time. This is a logical proposition. And yet, what if there are no “places”, no “locations”, no “localities”, no “space”?

      March 21, 2017
      1. rallen2

        We have been trained to believe that information cannot instantaneously influence, affect, communicate, or cause an effect, or have an impact, at some other point, and yet there is quantum entanglement.

        March 21, 2017
  2. magnocrat

    Its not a problem for highly intelligent scientists they left intuition in favour of experimental results when the enlightenment started. In a but shell to hell with the reasons if it works use it.

    March 22, 2017
    1. rallen2

      But there are theoretical physicists as well as experimental physicists. Theoretical physicists seek more understanding, whereas experimental physicists seek more technological applications. Experimental physicists test the theories with experiments, and the process of testing often leads to the discovery of new applications.

      March 22, 2017
  3. magnocrat

    The experimental ones are mostly engineers who do you think built the Hadron Collider mathematicians?

    March 22, 2017
    1. rallen2

      True. Experimental physicists are usually engineers. I’m sure mathematicians and theorists had a lot of input in the design of the LHC.

      March 23, 2017
  4. magnocrat

    Yes indeed.

    March 23, 2017